Tag Archives: New Zealand

New Zealand Selects one2many for National Emergency Mobile Alert System


the world’s leading Wireless Broadcast company, has been selected by New Zealand’s Ministry of Civil Defence & Emergency Management (MCDEM) to deploy a national Wireless Emergency Alert system. The system will enable government agencies to warn at-risk communities of critical adverse events and threats to life, health and property by sending emergency alerts to their mobile phones. The cloud-based service will be fully managed by one2many for up to 12 years.

To enable the system, one2many has delivered its new Public Warning Portal cloud service to MCDEM: a mobile alert creation and management system that emergency management personnel can use to generate public warnings. The Public Warning Portal also enables automatic alert generation, which can enable alerts to be swiftly issued for emergencies such as tsunamis or earthquakes. The open architecture of the Portal means that MCDEM will in the future be able to integrate any additional emergency alert channels, such as social media, TV and radio, without comprising its reliability or requiring changes to the system.

As part of the deployment, one2many also delivered its Cell Broadcast Systems in the private cloud of New Zealand’s mobile operators’ networks: Spark, Vodafone NZ and 2degrees. one2many’s software securely interfaces with MCDEM’s public cloud-based Public Warning Portal to enable the broadcast of emergency alerts to all 3G and 4G mobile subscribers within the location of an emergency. Crucially, people do not need to download an app on their mobile phone or subscribe to a service. If their phone is on, capable of receiving the alert and inside the target area then they should receive the alert.

David Coetzee, Manager, Capability & Operations at New Zealand’s Ministry of Civil Defence & Emergency Management, commented: “In a country where emergencies such as natural disasters are all too common, it’s essential we have multiple robust and reliable means of alerting the public to threats. one2many met all our stringent demands for this contract and are delivering a managed cloud service that’s easy-to-use, secure and comprehensive. Importantly, one2many proved they could meet our exceptionally short delivery timeframe. We’re very happy that the system launched successfully last November 26, and will help us and other agencies to continue to improve the safety of our communities.”

Maarten Mes, managing director of one2many, commented: “one2many is currently the only company in the world able to provide a best-in-class, end-to-end wireless emergency alert solution. Our innovative cloud-based technology, which has been developed by in-house engineers, draws on decades of emergency alert experience to deliver governments and mobile operators with a reliable, secure and geo-targeted means of protecting their citizens. This significant implementation in New Zealand highlights our leadership in this domain and we are proud to have delivered this important project for the country within the tight timelines.”

 

Source: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20180208005832/en/

Anúncios

‘No rude awakening’ – Civil Defence to test emergency alert system


Civil Defence is giving notice about their plans to test the new mobile emergency alert system in a couple of weeks time.

The forewarning comes after a rude awakening last month where text messages were accidently sent out in the very early hours of the morning.

This test is set to take place between 6pm and 7pm on Sunday the 26th.

Enabled phones will emit a penetrating warning sound, and show a test warning message.

Using cell broadcast technology, there’s no need to sign up or download an app, and you can’t opt out.

Civil Defence Minister Kris Faafoi warns that not everyone will get them.

“About 30 per cent of phones, or about two million phones, will be able to get them. Over time over the next three years we think that will get through to about 70 per cent.”

Faafoi asks that those who can receive the warnings, spread the word to family and neighbours – in a real emergency.

The alerts are another important warning tool, along with the radio and TV broadcasts, reminds Faafoi.

Source: https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/no-rude-awakening-civil-defence-test-emergency-alert-system

Tsunami awareness saves lives


Tsunami awareness saves lives

World Tsunami Awareness Day on Sunday 5 November is a chance for all of us to find out more about tsunami and how to prepare for them, Civil Defence Minister Kris Faafoi says.

“Today I have been visiting Seatoun School who have demonstrated use of their tsunami evacuation steps. Seatoun School recognised their tsunami risk and installed steps for their students and wider community so that everyone can evacuate to higher ground.

“All of New Zealand’s coast line is at risk of tsunami.”

“For most of us that means we live near, or visit, places that are at risk and we need to know the right action to take. For a local source tsunami, which could arrive in minutes, there won’t be time for an official warning. It is important to recognise the natural warning signs and act quickly.”

“If you are at the coast and experience any of the following:
• Feel a strong earthquake that makes it hard to stand up, or a long earthquake that lasts a minute or more
• See a sudden rise or fall in sea level
• Hear loud and unusual noises from the sea.

“Move immediately to the nearest high ground, or as far inland as you can.”

“World Tsunami Awareness Day is a chance for all New Zealanders to learn more about the tsunami risk in our regions, know how to prepare for them and update our plans to keep our families safe.”

“It’s important to stay informed if there is an emergency. Know which radio stations to listen to, which websites and social media to follow, get to know your neighbours, and check whether your phone can receive Emergency Mobile Alerts.”

“It’s great to see that a new nationwide emergency alert channel is being implemented to complement the existing channels to stay informed. A live nationwide test of the Emergency Mobile Alert system will be held on 26 November 2017 to test the system.”

Emergency Mobile Alert messages are sent using cell broadcast technology, so there is no need to sign up or download an app, and can be targeted to affected areas, so you will only get it if the emergency is in your area.

The alert messages can only be sent by the Ministry of Civil Defence & Emergency Management, Civil Defence Emergency Management Groups, NZ Police, Fire and Emergency New Zealand, the Ministry of Health and the Ministry for Primary Industries.

You can find out whether your phone can receive the alerts at www.civildefence.govt.nz. Make sure your phone is on the most up to date operating system.

In a distant or regional tsunami there may be time to send an alert.

For local source tsunami, there may not be time to send an alert so it is important to recognise the natural warnings – ‘Long or Strong, Get Gone’.

Emergency Mobile Alert is an additional channel to help keep people safe in an emergency. It does not replace other emergency alerts. If you feel your life is in danger, don’t wait for an official warning. Take immediate action.

Visit www.happens.nz to find out how to prepare for emergencies.

Source: http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/PO1711/S00047/tsunami-awareness-saves-lives.htm

Cell Broadcast New Zealand – Alert

Cell broadcast alerting on track for late 2017


Civil Defence Minister Gerry Brownlee says the implementation of a new nationwide channel for sending alerts about emergencies to mobile phones is on track to be up and running by the end of the year.

Cell broadcast alerting is a new way of sending information to mobile phones in a set area without people needing to download an app or subscribe to a service.

“The alerts will appear similar to text messages. They are received automatically and for free by all cell broadcast enabled mobile phones in the area,” Mr Brownlee says.

“Discussions with New Zealand’s major telecommunications companies are progressing well and we expect to have contracts signed in the coming weeks.

“Once the cell broadcast alerting system is up and running, an alert will be sent out to mobile phones through the cell towers in the affected areas in the event of an emergency.

“As no technology is 100 per cent failsafe or equally useful in all conditions and emergencies, multiple channels will continue to be used to send alerts when emergencies happen.

“These channels include radio, television, websites, various social media, smartphone apps, sirens and others.

“A range of alerting methods were assessed before cell broadcast was chosen but this system gives the best combination of reach and reliability in New Zealand’s conditions.

“It will get information about an emergency to at-risk communities faster and more reliably than ever before. Plus, cell broadcast technology is not vulnerable to network overloading, so even when the networks get busy after a disaster, alerts can still be sent quickly.

“The system is well established elsewhere in the world in counties such as the US, Japan, Israel, Chile, the Netherlands and Taiwan.

“Countries including Canada, Peru, the UAE and the Philippines are in the process of implementing cell broadcast alerting.

“The Ministry of Civil Defence & Emergency Management and the three mobile network operators – 2degrees, Vodafone and Spark – are working together to enable cell broadcast technology in New Zealand for the first time.

“The Ministry is working alongside the Fire Service, Police, Ministry of Health and Ministry for Primary Industries to develop a system that will work for the whole of government.

“Cell broadcast alerts don’t replace the need for people to pay attention to natural warnings, which is particularly important in the case of earthquakes and potential tsunamis,” Mr Brownlee says.

Fonte: https://www.national.org.nz/cell_broadcast_alerting_on_track_for_late_2017

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